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How Actor Ethan Suplee Has Maintained His Nearly 300-Pound Weight Loss – NBC New York

Actor Ethan Suplee was 24 years outdated in 2001 when he discovered himself standing on a freight scale at a delivery middle.

It was a humiliating detour for Suplee earlier than checking right into a remedy middle for drug and alcohol dependancy. The facility required his weight for consumption, however they didn’t have a scale for sufferers his measurement.



“I was utterly horrified,” Suplee, now 44, instructed TODAY Health.

At the time, the “Boy Meets World” alum was carrying roughly 536 kilos on his 6-foot-1 body and was affected by congestive coronary heart failure.

But regardless of the wake-up name, Suplee estimates he gained a further 14 kilos in rehab.

“I’d eat and eat,” Suplee revealed. “It’s what I’d always done.”

Not anymore.

Today, the actor finest recognized for his function as dim-witted Randy Hickey on “My Name Is Earl,” weighs 255 kilos and has shredded down to simply 11% physique fats.

But as Suplee talks about on his “American Glutton” podcast, it was not a linear journey to well being.

Over the course of his lifetime, Suplee has lost and gained roughly 1,000 kilos. He tried numerous diets from Atkins to anti-inflammatory eating plans. At factors, he was driving his bike 100 miles per week.

It wasn’t till 2018, when all the things clicked for Suplee, who shares 4 youngsters along with his spouse, Brandy Lewis. That’s when Suplee stumbled throughout a TED Talk by Mike Isratel and realized carbs and gluten weren’t the issue. The downside was his relationship with meals.

Professional dieter

Suplee’s sophisticated relationship with meals dates again to age 5, when his well-meaning grandparents put him on a restrictive consuming plan.

“It was coming from a place of love and concern, but it had this terrible reverse effect where I was like, ‘OK. I’m just gonna sneak food whenever I possibly can.’ And that became my habit,” Suplee recalled. “I would binge when nobody was looking.”

On TV and film units, Suplee would make the most of the free catering, however provided that the coast was clear.

“I’d fill my pockets and go back to my trailer,” he stated. “Then I’d hit a drive-thru and buy enough food to feed a small family and sit in my house alone and eat it.”

Suplee dreaded touring on airplanes as a result of it meant asking a flight attendant for a seat belt extender. He was too self-conscious to hitch his children within the water.

“Everything was a struggle,” he stated. “I couldn’t sit down in a chair without first trying to conspicuously test its strength. I couldn’t stand in a line of people without having certain parts of my stomach brush up against them.”

When Suplee had success with a food regimen — and he typically did — the load would come crashing again on, leaving him feeling defeated.

“I always truly believed that I’d found the diet, the best diet, and then when I failed, I’d think, ‘Why should I try something that’s not the best diet?’” he defined. “It was a bad cycle.”

Living wholesome

Suplee was following a really low-carb, high-fat ketogenic food regimen when he landed on Isratel’s TED Talk in 2018 and had a life-changing epiphany. It wasn’t what he was consuming, it was how a lot he was consuming.

“I began tracking what I was putting in my body and introduced carbs back into my diet,” Suplee said. “I started eating what I wanted, but in portions that were appropriate for my body.”

Last year, Suplee wrote an essay for Men’s Health outlining his balanced method.

“The main thing I had to do was make sure I didn’t eat more calories than I expended each day. And guess what? Foods that were nutritious — dark leafy greens, chicken, salmon — also tended to be much lower in calories than, say, a two-patty Super Star,” he shared. “As I became more calorie conscious, I started to binge less and fill up on healthier foods. After a few months of this, calories stopped being calories. They started being food.”

Suplee now follows a high-protein, moderate-carb, low-fat plan that enables for rice, potatoes and pasta — though he limits himself to 1 cup.

“I don’t want to call it a diet,” Suplee defined. “I’m just eating like a normal person.”

Suplee additionally lifts weights six occasions per week for an hour a day. Sometimes he’ll do cardio, however just for 20 minutes at a time.

At 255 kilos, he’s presently in maintenance mode, with a clear invoice of well being.

Suplee’s total household is reaping the advantages — particularly his spouse.

“She’s very happy. You know, Brandy’s been with me through very, very extreme miserable diets where I was eating like 400 calories a day and wasn’t such a pleasant person,” he instructed TODAY. “I have the energy to do things now. Life is so much better.”

This story first appeared on TODAY.com. More from TODAY:



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